Quality & Patient Safety

quality & patient Safety

Heart Attack Performance Measures

A heart attack, or myocardial infarction, occurs when one or more regions of the heart muscle experience a severe or prolonged decrease in oxygen supply caused by blocked blood flow to the heart muscle.  

The following graph shows how MUSC performed on three key measures related to care for patients being treated for a heart attack.  Each measure represents what percentage of the time patients received the recommended care, so a higher score represents better performance.  The numbers reported are from October - December 2013. 

Appropriate Care Measure
Heart Attack


Heart Attack graph

graph legend

Aspirin Prescribed at Discharge
Beta Blocker Prescribed at Discharge
PCI received within 90 minutes of hospital arrival

Where to go for more information:

Aspirin Prescribed at Discharge

Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients without aspirin contraindications who are prescribed aspirin at hospital discharge.  Aspirin therapy in patients who have suffered an acute myocardial infarction reduces the risk of adverse events and mortality. Studies have demonstrated that aspirin can reduce this risk by 20% and national guidelines strongly recommend long-term aspirin for the secondary prevention of subsequent cardiovascular events in eligible older patients discharged after AMI. *

Beta Blocker Prescribed at Discharge

Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients without beta-blocker contraindications who are prescribed a beta-blocker at hospital discharge. The use of beta-blockers for patients who have suffered an acute myocardial infarction can reduce mortality and morbidity. Studies have demonstrated that the use of beta-blockers is associated with about a 20% reduction in this risk and there is evidence of effectiveness in broad populations of patients with AMI. *

PCI received within 90 minutes of hospital arrival

Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients receiving primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) during the hospital stay with a time from hospital arrival to PCI of 90 minutes or less.  The early use of primary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction who present with ST-segment elevation or LBBB results in a significant reduction in mortality and morbidity. *

*Source:  The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the Joint Commission "Specification Manual for National Hospital Quality Measures."

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