Plastic Surgery

plastic surgery

Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery

Congenital Hand Deformities

  • Webbed Fingers (Syndactyly)
    • Typically two fingers are fused together.  The surgeon often uses zig-zag incisions to separate the fingers, creating triangular skin flaps.
  • Extra Fingers (Polydactyly)
    • This usually affects the thumb, great toe or the little finger
    • Extra digits are typically incomplete and may be without bone
    • The removal technique depends on the type of extra finger present
  • Infant Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)
    • Trigger finger results from inflammation or swelling of the fibrous sheath that encloses the tendons that causes difficulty to straighten a finger (or fingers) once bent.
  • Other common congenital defects include short, missing or deformed fingers, immobile tendons, etc.
  • Operating room procedures
  • Recovery time varies

Adult Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

  • Trigger finger results from inflammation or swelling of the fibrous sheath that encloses the tendons that causes difficulty to straighten a finger (or fingers) once bent.

Dupuytrens Disease

  • A disorder of the skin and underlying tissue on the palm side of the hand.  Thick, scar-like tissue forms under the skin of the palm.  The surgeon will cut and separate the bands of thickened tissue, freeing the tendons and allowing better finger movement.
  • Operating room procedure
  • Recovery time two to four weeks

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

  • The carpal tunnel is a passageway through the wrist carrying tendons and one of the hand's major nerves.  Pressure may build up within the tunnel which places pressure on the nerve within the tunnel.  This causes a tingling sensation in the hand, often accompanied by numbness, aching, and impaired hand function.
  • The band over the carpal tunnel is released.
  • Operating room procedure
  • Recovery time depends on severity of damage to nerve.

Ulnar Nerve Compression

  • Ulnar neuropathy is an inflammation of the ulnar nerve, a major nerve in your arm that runs down into your hand.  It supplies movement and sensation to your arm and hand.  Ulnar neuropathy causes numbness, tingling, or pain into the arm and hand on the side of the little finger.
  • The nerve can be squeezed at the elbow or wrist.
  • Operating room procedure
  • Recovery time depends on severity of damage to nerve.

Nerve Injuries

  • Some nerves can heal spontaneously if bruised.  However, if the nerve is cut then it will require surgery to be repaired.
  • Operating room procedure
  • Recovery time depends on nerve injured.  Nerves grow at a rate of one inch per month.

Finger, Hand or Wrist Fractures

  • Depending on the type of fracture a splint may be placed or "buddy taping" may be used.  Fractures that are large, crooked, or go into the joint may need surgery.
  • Fractures needing surgery will be repaired in the operating room.
  • Recovery time depends on type of fracture.

Tendon Injury

  • If untreated, a flexor tendon is unlikely to heal on its own.  A complete cut through the tendon results in the inability to bend one or both of the finger knuckles.
  • Some tendons may be splinted and others require surgery in the operating room.
  • Recovery time is at least six weeks.

Hand Tumors

  • Ganglia - Soft tumor cysts arising from joint capsules or tendon sheaths, filled with fluid.  They can vary in size from a small pea to a golf ball, and are the most common mass occurring in the hand or wrist.  Depending on their size and location, ganglion cysts can result in limited motion.
  • Giant Cell Tumor - These occur on the palm side of the finger, usually to people over the age of 30, somewhat more often to women than men (ratio of 3:2).  A giant cell tumor is a slowly enlarging painless mass.  Sometimes patients will have limited tendon function due to scarring.
  • Epidermal Inclusion Cyst - Located on the fingertip or anywhere there has been a penetrating injury.  Seen most often in people between teens and middle age, more common in men.  They are a painless, slow-growing, round soft-tissue mass.
  • Glomus Tumor - Fifty percent of these occur under the fingernail, usually to people between the ages of 30 and 50 years, twice as often to women as men.  They produce a number of symptoms: marked pain, cold intolerance, very tender, with a blue discoloration of the fingernail.
  • Lipomas - Occur in the padded (thenar) surface of the palm below the thumb and in the first web space of the hand, usually to people between the ages of 30 and 60, with a slight predominance in women.
  • Enchondroma - Affect the lowest portion of the finger closest to the palm (proximal phalange).  They are seen in people between the ages of 10 and 60, and appear to both men and women equally.  They may become painful after a fracture injury.  The finger will appear swollen.
  • Other types of tumors
  • Operating room procedure
  • Recovery time varies

Hands in a circle

 
 
 

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