Medical University of South Carolina Hospital logo
Home |  Video Library | Podcast Library | e-Newsletters | Classes & Events | About Us | News Blog | University & Colleges 
Contact Us | 843-792-1414
  

Patients & Visitors

Medical Services

Maps & Parking

Health Library

Physician Portal

Careers

Online Services
Health Library
Health Topics A to Z
Clinical Trials & Research
Tests & Procedures
Lab Tests & Results
Health Assessment Tools
Treatment Options
Symptom Checker
Health e-Newsletters
Podcast Library
Video Library
Health Library
Bookmark Page icon Bookmark |

Print this page icon

|

E-mail icon

Health Library : Safety and Injury Prevention

 

Water Safety

Drowning is the leading cause of unintentional injury-related death for children ages 1 to 4. It takes only seconds to drown, and often occurs silently when an unsupervised child is near water.

Although most drownings occur in residential swimming pools, children can drown in just one inch of water (such as in buckets, bath tubs, wading pools, diaper pails, and toilets). In addition, open waters such as oceans, rivers, and lakes pose a drowning threat to older children.

Consider these facts concerning drowning from the National SAFE KIDS Campaign:

  • When a child is submerged two minutes in water, he/she loses consciousness.
  • Irreversible brain damage sets in after four to six minutes of water submersion.
  • Most children die if they are found after 10 minutes in the water.

Parents are advised to take the following preventive steps to protect their children from drowning:

  • Never leave your child unsupervised near water at or in the home, or around any body of water, including a swimming pool.
  • Learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), as well as infant and child first-aid.
  • Do not rely on personal flotation devices (PDFs) or swimming lessons to protect your child.
  • Install childproof fencing around swimming pools.
  • Make sure you have rescue equipment, a telephone, and emergency phone numbers near the swimming pool.
  • Insist that your child wear a US Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device on boats at all times.
  • Do not allow children to dive in waters less than nine feet deep.

There are many different water-related incidences that require emergency clinical care by a physician or other healthcare professional. Listed in the directory left are some considerations, for which a brief overview has been provided.

If you cannot find the information in which you are interested, please visit the Safety and Injury Prevention Online Resources page in this website for an Internet address that may contain additional information on that topic.


 Sources & References

OUR SERVICES

 Find an MUSC Doctor:
 »Emergency Medicine


 

RELATED INFORMATION

About This Site   |   Disclaimer   |  Privacy   |   Accessibility   |   Donations   |   Site Map
171 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29403 1.843.792.1414 | © 2014 Medical University of South Carolina

mobile web site iconrss feed iconText Messaging iconPodcast Library