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Health Library : Diabetes

 

Oral Medications

Oral medication for persons with type 2 diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes may need to take one or more types of diabetes pills to lower their blood sugar. There are many types of diabetes pills and each type has a specific action.

Diabetic pills that lower the blood sugar levels include the following types:

Biguanides Biguanides decrease the amount of sugar produced in the liver and also lower the amount of blood glucose by making it easier for muscle tissue to absorb glucose.
Sulfonylureas Sulfonylureas stimulate the production of insulin in the pancreas and help the body to use the insulin that is currently being produced.
Meglitinides Meglitinides stimulate the production of insulin in the pancreas, but are shorter acting than sulfonylureas.
Thiazolidinediones Thiazolidinediones help make the cells in the body more sensitive to insulin.
Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors block the enzymes that digest starches, resulting in a slower rise in the blood sugar.
DPP-IV inhibitors DPP-IV inhibitors enhance the body's own ability to lower high blood sugar levels by blocking an enzyme called dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV). When DPP-IV is blocked, proteins which increase the release of insulin after blood sugar rises are able to work longer, thus lowering blood sugar.

Each type of medication will help lower the blood sugar levels in a different way. Some people with type 2 diabetes may take a combination of diabetes pills and insulin. Your doctor will prescribe the treatment plan that will work best for you and will give you directions as to the times, dosage, and frequency of each type of medication.

Only people with type 2 diabetes use oral medications. Oral medications are not helpful for a person with type 1 diabetes whose pancreas has lost most or all ability to produce insulin.

Maintaining a proper diet and a regular exercise program are both important steps in controlling diabetes, even when taking oral medications. Oral medications are designed to work with diet and exercise, not in place of them.

Click here to view the
Online Resources of Diabetes


 Sources & References

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RELATED INFORMATION

 Interactive Tools:
 »Diabetes Quiz

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