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Health Library : Oral Health

 

Dental Care for Infants and Children

Thumb-Sucking and Dental Health

Generally, thumb-sucking before the age of two is normal and harmless. When thumb-sucking is not stopped by the appropriate age (generally by the age of five), then parents should discourage the act. Prolonged thumb-sucking may contribute to crowded and/or crooked teeth development and bite problems.

When should dental care begin?

Most pediatric dentists will agree that regular dental care should begin by one year of age, with dental check-ups at least twice each consecutive year for most children. Some children may need more frequent checkups. The following dental checklist for infants and toddlers has been provided by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD):

Birth to six months of age:

  • Clean the infant's mouth with water and a cloth or gauze or use a soft infant toothbrush after feedings and at bedtime.
  • Consult your child's pediatrician regarding fluoride supplements.
  • Regulate feeding habits (bottle feeding and breastfeeding).

Six to 12 months of age:

  • During this time, the first tooth should appear. Consult the pediatric dentist for an examination as soon as the first tooth comes in, but at least no later than the first birthday.
  • Brush teeth after each feeding and at bedtime with a small, soft-bristled brush.
  • As the child begins to walk, stay alert of potential dental and/or facial injuries.
  • Wean the child from the bottle by his/her first birthday. (If a woman breastfeeds her child, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding for at least one year. The World Health Organization recommends breastfeeding for at least two years.)

Twelve to 24 months of age:

  • Follow the schedule of dental examinations and cleanings, as recommended by your child's pediatric dentist. Generally, dental examinations and cleanings are recommended every 6 months for children and adults.
  • As your child learns to rinse his/her mouth, and as most deciduous (baby) teeth have erupted by this age, brushing with a pea-sized portion of fluoridated toothpaste is best.

Facts about deciduous teeth:

Proper care of a child's deciduous teeth (also known as "baby" or primary teeth) is very important as these teeth hold space for the future eruption of permanent teeth.

  • If a baby tooth decays or is removed too early, the space necessary for the permanent teeth is lost and can only be regained through orthodontic treatment.
  • Infected baby teeth can cause the permanent teeth to develop improperly resulting in stains, pits, and weaker teeth.
  • Primary teeth are important in speech development.
  • Primary teeth aid in chewing food properly, promoting healthy nutrition.

Most children begin losing their baby teeth around the age of six - usually the front teeth first. They continue to lose baby teeth until the age of 12 or 13 when all of the permanent teeth finally come through, except for the third molars (wisdom teeth). These molars begin to appear around age 17 to 21.

Diet and dental care for children:

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends the following to ensure your child eats correctly to maintain a healthy body and teeth:

  • Ask your pediatric dentist to help you assess your child's diet.
  • Shop smart. Do not routinely stock your pantry with sugary or starchy snacks. Buy "fun foods" just for special times.
  • Limit the number of snack times; choose nutritious snacks.
  • Provide a balanced diet, and save foods with sugar or starch for mealtimes.
  • Do not put your young child to bed with a bottle of milk, formula, or juice.
  • If your child chews gum or sips soda, choose those without sugar.

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