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Health Library : Eye Care

 

Eye Safety at the Computer

Eye strain and computer use

The following are the most common symptoms of eye strain, which may be attributed to prolonged computer screen viewing. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

  • Red, watery, irritated eyes
  • Tired, aching, or heavy eyelids
  • Problems with focusing
  • Muscle spasms of the eye or eyelid
  • Headache
  • Backache

Symptoms of eye strain are often relieved by resting the eyes, changing the work environment, and/or wearing the proper glasses. The symptoms of eye strain may resemble other eye conditions. Consult a doctor for diagnosis.

How is eyestrain avoided?

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has provided the following helpful suggestions for making the appropriate workstation modifications to help avoid eye strain:

  • Position the video display terminal (VDT) slightly further away than where you normally hold reading material.
  • Position the top of the VDT screen at or slightly below eye level.
  • Place all reference material as close to the screen as possible to minimize head and eye movements and focusing changes.
  • Minimize lighting reflections and glare.
  • Keep the VDT screen clean and dust-free.
  • Schedule periodic rest breaks to avoid eye fatigue.
  • Keep the eyes lubricated (by blinking or using lubricating eye drops) to prevent them from drying out.
  • Keep the VDT screen in proper focus.
  • Consult your ophthalmologist or optometrist, as some individuals who normally do not need glasses may need corrective lenses for computer work.

Click here to view the
Online Resources of Eye Care


 Sources & References

OUR SERVICES

 Find an MUSC Doctor:
 »Ophthalmology
 »Family Medicine
 »General Internal Medicine


 Treatment at MUSC:
 »Magill Laser Center
 »Storm Eye Institute

 

RELATED INFORMATION

 Tests & Procedures:
 »Evoked Potentials Studies

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