Kids Health - Medical University of South Carolinahttp://www.muschealth.com/Keep current with new health news updates.en-us20MUSChealth.comhttp://www.muschealth.com/favicon.gifhttp://www.muschealth.com/ The Benefits of Well-Child Visitshttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10703Childhood is prime time for episodes worthy of a doctor visit. Sprains, concussions, and ear infections—to name just a few. A trip to the doctor when your child is well can be just as essential. Periodic well-child visits can alert you to developmental delays and provide valuable parenting advice. They may even help deter critical care, such as hospitalizations. at MUSChttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10703Sun, 1 Sep 2013 04:00:00 GMTDeciphering Autism’s Originshttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10687More parents and doctors are on the alert for autism spectrum disorder (ASD )—often simply called autism. They know its symptoms: social problems, communication troubles, and repetitive behavior. This greater awareness may be behind rising rates of ASD, particularly in children ages 6 to 17. at MUSChttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10687Thu, 1 Aug 2013 04:00:00 GMTStart Sun Protection Younghttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10671Sunscreen may already be a family staple for a trip to the beach or an afternoon by the pool. But protecting your child from skin cancer requires more than a dab of sun defense. A recent study found that melanoma—the deadliest type of skin cancer—is becoming more common in children. Teaching your child proper sun safety early can prevent skin cancer for a lifetime. at MUSChttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10671Mon, 1 Jul 2013 04:00:00 GMTFamily Focus: Less Sodium for Allhttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10655Your child probably loves pizza. And how about hot dogs, lunch meat, or cheese? In addition to being many children’s favorites, these foods are high in sodium. They contribute to a startling fact: Many children eat as much sodium as adults in the U.S. That’s setting the table for serious concerns about children’s future heart health. at MUSChttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10655Sat, 1 Jun 2013 04:00:00 GMTChildren Can Suffer ACL Injuries, Toohttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10631Parents of young athletes may expect the occasional bruise, scrape, or pulled muscle. But an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) may seem a more likely concern for a professional running back or a slam-dunking hoop star. Yet millions of children every year suffer serious sports injuries, including torn ACLs. at MUSChttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10631Wed, 1 May 2013 04:00:00 GMTEnergy Drinks: Not a Good Choice for Childrenhttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10623They’re labeled with compelling names, such as Monster Energy and Rockstar. X-Game athletes sport their brands on jackets and hats. Energy drinks exude an ethos that attracts many children and young adults. Although these beverages may be considered cool, they’re not a healthy choice for your child. at MUSChttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10623Mon, 1 Apr 2013 04:00:00 GMTGive Your Child an Academic Boost—Exercise! http://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10607Keeping your child active may not always be easy. Children may be more interested in video games, YouTube videos, or the latest episode of American Idol. But regular physical activity can help curb childhood obesity, an epidemic that affects more than 12 million U.S. kids. Urging your child to move more has other benefits, too. It may even improve academic performance. at MUSChttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10607Fri, 1 Mar 2013 04:00:00 GMTPreventing Teen Dating Abusehttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10591The teen years can be an exciting and anxious time for your child – and you. One of the more nerve-wracking moments may be your child’s dating. It’s natural for a parent to worry. You want to keep your child safe. Knowing about the dangers of teen dating violence can help you prevent it and, if needed, identify such abuse. at MUSChttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10591Fri, 1 Feb 2013 04:00:00 GMTFlame Retardants May Affect Kids’ Developmenthttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10572The family’s well-worn couch. Grandpa’s favorite old chair. Of all the things parents may worry about, these items probably don’t make the list. But according to a new study, maybe they should, particularly if they contain flame retardants. Furniture, carpet, electronics, and other products that are made with such chemicals may increase a child’s risk for developmental problems. Exposure to them may lead to a lower IQ, inattention, and coordination troubles. at MUSChttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10572Tue, 1 Jan 2013 04:00:00 GMTMore Youths Abuse Painkillershttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10550Talking with your child about drug abuse is important. It helps to keep him or her healthy. But did you know you should cover prescription painkillers in that chat? A new study points to why. at MUSChttp://www.muschealth.com/gs/Enewsletter.aspx?action=showPage&pageid=P10550Sat, 1 Dec 2012 04:00:00 GMT