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Cancer Health Library : Oncology


Cancer Treatment: Hyperthermia For Cancer Treatment

What is hyperthermia in cancer treatment?

Hyperthermia is heat therapy. Heat has been used for hundreds of years as cancer therapy. Scientists believe that heat may help shrink tumors by damaging cells or depriving them of the substances they need to live. There are research studies underway to determine the use and effectiveness of hyperthermia in cancer treatment.

How is it used?

Heat can be applied to a very small area, to an organ or limb, or to the whole body. Hyperthermia is usually used with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and other cancer treatments. The types of hyperthermia are described in the following chart:

Type of hyperthermiaTreatment areaMethod of application
Local hyperthermiaTreatment area includes a tumor or other small area.
  • Heat is applied from the outside with high-frequency waves aimed at the tumor.

    or
  • Inside the body a small area may be heated with thin heated wire probes or implanted microwave antennae and radiofrequency electrodes.
Regional hyperthermiaAn organ or a limb is treated.
  • Devices that produce high energy are placed over the region to be heated.

    or
  • Some of the patient's blood is removed, heated, and then pumped into the region to be heated. The process is called perfusion.
Whole-body hyperthermiaThe whole body is treated.
  • Warm water blankets
  • Inductive coils (similar to the coils in an electric blanket)
  • Thermal room or chambers

Are there any side effects?

Side effects may include skin discomfort or local pain. Hyperthermia can also cause blisters and occasionally burns, but generally these heal quickly. Local hyperthermia can cause pain at the site, infection, blood clots, burns, and damage to the muscles, skin, and nerves in the treated area. Whole body hyperthermia can cause diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. Please note that improved technology, research, and treatment experience have resulted in fewer side effects. Most side effects people experience are short-term and not serious.

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Online Resources of Cancer Center


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